Gwyneth Paltrow Nude.. hot!

Howdy! Honourable when you take up Gwyneth Paltrow nude couldn’t get any ultra lessen, she goes and flashes her portion in her new performance Two Lovers.

Gwyneth Paltrow Nude

Gwyneth Paltrow’s breast loyal steals that sort, so a great number so you would it should get it’s own horses in the reduce’s credits. I suspect if it has it’s own pattern

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SUPER 8: The Film Babble Blog Review

SUPER 8 (Dir. J.J. Abrams, 2011)

Having grown up during the golden age of Spielberg (i.e. the late ’70s-early ’80s) I was immediately in tune with the vibe Abrams was going for here. It helps that mood and tone that SUPER 8 is set in a small mid-western town in 1979, and centers around a group of pre-teen kids.

Joel Courtney, who’s never acted in a movie before, stars as a shy model building C-student whose mother is killed in an accident at her factory workplace. His grieving father (Kyle Chandler) is the town’s deputy, and for obvious reasons things are strained between father and son.

Courtney’s pushy friend (Riley Griffith) is making a super 8 zombie movie, and with a small crew of kids, including fire-works crazy Ryan Lee, klutzy Zach Mills, and geeky Gabriel Basso, they sneak out late one night to work on it.

Griffith invites Elle Fanning to play the lead character’s wife, and because she has a car, to the excitement of Courtney who has a crush on her.

In the middle of filming on the platform of an old rickety train station, a freight train comes nosily down the tracks. Griffiths wants to get it on film citing “production values,” but Courtney sees a truck racing towards the train, and then there’s a ginormous crash, completely derailing the engine and all the compartments in a series of fiery explosions. The kids escape unharmed, well, one claims he was “scraped”, and recognize the driver of the truck as one of their school teachers.

They frantically leave the area when a bunch of shadowy men with flashlights descend on the wreckage.

That’s the set-up, and it’s a great one. From there a entertainingly tangled narrative involving a military cover-up, a budding romance between Courtney and Fanning, and, yes, a mysterious alien creature that was in one of the train’s compartments unfolds.

A wide-eyed sense of wonder coupled with cynicism about government misinformation effectively evokes the atmosphere of CLOSE ENCOUNTERS and E.T., which is no surprise as Spielberg produced, and the film is a collaboration of Amblin Entertainment and Bad Robot Productions.

Like with his STAR TREK reboot, Abrams shows that he has a great grip on face-paced storytelling. As the movie lays out all its alien cards, the proceedings get a bit predictable, but the compelling craft on display never falters.

Abrams also gets the Spielbergian sentimentality down. No other recent sci-fi CGI blockbuster lately has had this much heart.

It’s a promising debut for Courtney, who endearingly captures the awe in this tale of how kids can outsmart the authorities, figure out a complex conspiracy, and help an alien get back home.

As for the rest of the cast – Fanning brings poise to a standard damsel in distress part, the set of smart- alecky kid are perfectly cast, and Chandler infuses his troubled cop character with intensity.

However, Noah Emmerich as a U.S. Army representative is standard one note villain. He still kind of fits here because it’s a common theme in this genre that the real bad guys are the government powers that be, not the aliens. Sure, there’s a lot of killing at the claws of the creature, but that’s because of military mistreatment and wrongful imprisonment, you see?

With a nice blend of nostalgia, emotional pull, and incredible special effects, SUPER 8 is as touching as it is a lot of fun.

Any be sure to stay for the end credits. I’m not going to tell you why, but trust me – you won’t want to miss it.

More later…

JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER: The Film Babble Blog Review

JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (Dir. John Schultz, 2011)

In 1996 former Raleigh resident, and former member of local favorites the Connells, John Schultz made one of my favorite independent films: BANDWAGON, about a fictional struggling indie band.

Since then Schultz has been mainly making kids movies like LIKE MIKE, WHEN ZACHARY TAYLOR CAME TO TOWN, and ALIENS IN THE ATTIC.

That family film streak continues with JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER, based on Megan McDonald’s “Judy Moody” children’s book series, which I had never heard of befoer since I’m 41 and don’t have any kids.

Okay, so I’m not in the target audience for this movie.

I’ll still proceed – Jordana Beatty plays the precocious title character, who’s cute but often hyper-irritating as she bounces from frame to frame , spouting out self consciously hipisms like “rare” in place of “cool,” and plotting every activity with charts in a control freak manner that even annoys her close friends.

After their teacher Urkel (I mean Jaleel White) dismisses class for the summer, 2 of Beatty’s friends take off – Taylor Hender to clown camp; Garrett Ryan to circus camp.

Beatty is stuck with the nerdy Preston Bailey who gets in the way of racking up those “thrill-a-delic” points our heroine imposed on her chums.

Then there’s Parris Mosteller as Beatty’s brother Stink, who wishes to spend the summer tracking down Bigfoot, because reports indicate he’s in the area.

Their parents (Kristoffer Winters and Janet Varney) leave for a emergency trip (I can’t remember why or where), and Aunt Opal (Heather Graham) arrives to take care of the kids.

Graham is a free-spirited artist (she calls herself a “guerilla artist” but that’s hard to believe), and Beatty takes to her immediately.

Beatty’s Judy Moody exhausting antics in spastic scenes full of harmless destruction disinterested me to the point of wondering about Graham’s character. I kept thinking a dark side that she was running away from would be revealed (addiction, abusive relationship, something sinister), but then I caught myself – what the Hell kind of movie did I think I was watching?

This isn’t catching up with an aging Roller-Girl! This is a loud and brightly lit kid’s romp in which the only thing close to edgy is poop and vomit jokes.

I really feel out of my element writing about this movie. The kids at the preview screening were howling with laughter, while every tired gag made me roll my eyes. But again, this isn’t a movie for me.

It’s a disposable candy wrapper of a movie, that I bet kids will outgrow right after seeing it. Schultz seems to have found his niche making such teenybopper tripe. I’m sure it pays the bills, but when I think back to his promising debut BANDWAGON, it just doesn’t seem right.

At least Connells fans who take their kids to it will enjoy trying to pick out lead singer Doug MacMillon’s cameo (MacMillan has appeared in all of Schultz’s films).

That’s all I got out of it anyway.

More later…

Pamela Anderson ….. Bombastic Nude

DVD Review: RUBBER

RUBBER (Dir. Quentin Dupieux, 2010)

This film opens in a California desert on a road with wooden chairs strewn about. A car drives up knocking some of the chairs over. It parks in front of a man with a tie (Jack Plotnick) holding groups of binoculars by their straps with both hands.

Another man, dressed as a police officer, gets out of the trunk of the car, gets a glass of water from the driver, and walks towards the camera. The cop, played by Stephen Spinella, addresses the audience: “In the Stephen Spielberg movie E.T. why is the alien brown? No reason.”

Spinella asks several more nonsensical questions about movie premises, like in TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE why don’t we see the characters go to the bathroom?,” each time concluding “no reason.” He states that this film is “a homage to the ‘no reason.'” There’s no arguing with that.

We then see a small crowd of people who each are passed the binoculars by Plotnick. The people point their binoculars out into the desert, some wondering out loud about what knid of film they’re going to see.

So far, so weird.

From a distance the folks watch as a inanimate tire half buried in the sand, comes alive, pulls it self out of the ground and, shakes itself off and rolls down the road.

That’s right – a tire comes alive and heads out over the desert terrain. It figures out that it has the power to blow up bottles and cans, then the heads of animals and on to humans, so it goes on a killing spree starting with the residents of a flea bag hotel.

There the tire, named “Robert” in the credits, but never said out loud in the movie, watches a lot of TV while the people in the desert sleep and start to starve.

The next morning Plotnick drops a turkey on the ground and a disgusting scene of the crowd members tearing it apart ensues. A wheelchair bound almost unrecognizable Wings Hauser refrains from eating the turkey which turns out to be a good discussion as its poisoned.

Spinella, thinking the audience is all dead, starts to call off whatever this experiment is, telling people they can go home. When he finds out Hauser is still alive – it’s back on. Whatever this is.

Roxane Mesquida also appears as a woman who’s either just passing through the area or in cahoots with whoever is running this perplexing project.

For all its meta posturing, RUBBER feels like an excuse to blow up a bunch of prosthetic heads. There’s some gratuitous nudity of Mequida in a shower scene, commented on by the crowd of course, which at least I could see the point of.

I couldn’t see the point of any of the rest, even as an exercise of non-explanation. Dupieux displays a fluid visual style, but its in the service of an unfleshed premise that lacks wit, and relies too much on cheap semantics.

I wish Dupieux had just stuck to the story of a killer tire and lost all the film-within-a-film rigmarole.

He could’ve kept Spinella as the cop on the trail of the tire; it’s a role that reminds me of the George Hardy doofus hero character in TROLL 2, a film that oddly has more imagination than this one.

The answer “No reason” is actually apt here for I have no reason to recommend RUBBER.

Special Features: Interview with Quentin Dupieux, Interview with Stephen Spinella, Interview with Jack Plotnick, Inteview with Roxane Mequida, RUBBER Teaser Camera Tests, HDNet: A Look at “Rubber”, and the Theatrical Trailer.

More later…

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS: The Film Babble Blog Review

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (Dir. Matthew Vaughn, 2011)

Right off the bat it’s clear that Matthew Vaughn is a much better fit for the X-MEN movies than the previous directors (Brett Radner and Gavin Hood respectively). A strong opening sequence set in a concentration camp in Poland in 1944 shows Vaughn getting the edgy tense tone right in introducing a captured kid (Bill Milner) who has untrained telekinetic powers.

A sinister Kevin Bacon plays German Scientist Sebastian Shaw who recognizes the powers the boy has, and kills his mother (Éva Magyar) in an successful attempt to unleash them. Meanwhile, a young boy (Laurence Belcher) encounters a young girl (Morgan Lily) who’s broken into his Westchester County, NY mansion’s kitchen. She can morph her form into anybody’s with her true body being all blue and spiky, while he can read people’s minds.

They live together as brother and sister, growing up into James McAvoy and Jennifer Lawrence as the movie shifts to 1962. After witnessing supernatural activity in Las Vegas involving a never aging dapper Bacon and his crystalized co-hort Emma Frost (January Jones), CIA Agent Moira MacTaggart (Rose Byrne) seeks out McAvoy, because of his expertise on mutation.

So the mutants hook up with the CIA (who take a little convincing), and are stationed in a facility to train under the supervision of Oliver Platt who’s never given a character name. The concentration camp kid, now grown up into Michael Fassbender, tracks down Bacon to his yacht at the same time McAvoy does, but Bacon escapes in a souped up submarine.

There’s an amusing recruitment montage with McAvoy and Fassbender rounding up other mutants which is slickly cut with ’60s style and a Burt Bacharach-esque bounce to the soundtrack.

A sizable stable of characters is assembled including Nicholas Hoult, Álex González, Caleb Landry Jones, Zoë Isabella Kravitz, and Jason Flemyng, with the film juggling them capably. The film’s second half concerns the crew confronting the Cuban missile crisis with Bacon’s sinister Shaw, who’s a mutant himself, being the one responsible for the missiles’ transportation from Russia.

Like in all these comic book epics, the climax is an overblown battle. It’s an explosive spectacle with battleships filling the sky full of warheads.

Oddly, it feels like the influential touchstones of this movie are the STAR TREK reboot, and INGLORIOUS BASTERDS; it’s an origin story intertwined with an alternate history scenario, and I was surprised at how much of it worked.

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS is a better than average summer sequel (actually prequel) that despite being cluttered with clichés, cheesy moments, and bad dialogue (Bacon even says “come with me, and you’ll live like Kings…and Queens” at one point) offers a fair amount of fun.

The CGI is consistently top notch, as is the set design (I loved the complete replica of the War Room from DR. STRANGELOVE), and there’s a satisfying sweep to the storyline.

Particularly in the passion of Fassbender’s performance, the confidence of McAvoy, the angsty energy of Laurence, and Bacon having a ball with his Bondian villain of a role, it’s an incredibly effective cast.

On the minus side, some of Hoult’s mannerisms as Laurence’s possible love interest are annoying and his origin as “Beast” is undercooked, the young recruits are obnoxious, and January Jones never seems to be all there, but as she’s clad in white lingerie when she’s not crystalized, she obviously wasn’t hired for her acting ability.

Regardless this breathes fresh air into the franchise, especially after the lackluster X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE.

With this classy and exceedingly entertaining effort, consider the series rebooted.

More later…

Naruto 545: Edo vs. Edo/ Parent vs. Child

Naruto 544: Brothers

Naruto 543: What the Hell?

Naruto 542 Prediction